Saturday, March 9, 2013

Sanctions not fundamental to resolving North Korea problem: China


I would offer a slightly different view that will upset some and be panned by many.  What the Chinese could be saying between the lines is that the reality is that there is no carrot nor stick that can fundamentally change the Kim Family Regime behavior.  What we have seen since the death of Kim Jong-il is the pattern of behavior that has continued for six decades.  As long as the regime exists it will continue to conduct provocations to gain political and economic concessions, develop its nuclear and missile programs, sustain its huge conventional military, carry on its illicit activities around the world, and oppressing 23 million people under some of the worst human rights conditions in history.  As long as the Kim Family Regime exists the best we are going to be able to do is manage the crises and deter war while preparing for what comes next.  Not the best course of action I know but I believe all the hard-line and soft-line proposals will have no effect on the fundamental behavior and nature of the Regime.  But I do look forward to the silver bullet that I know someone will propose.  Unfortunately like most things in the real world there is no silver bullet.  But management of the situation and crises may be the least bad course of action (but again, management must include preparations for what comes next and I think we have to focus on the long term and when there is no longer a Kim Family Regime because getting to that is going to cost a lot of blood and treasure mainly of our long standing treaty ally, the ROK )
V/R
Dave
Sanctions not fundamental to resolving North Korea problem: China




BEIJING | Fri Mar 8, 2013 10:04pm EST
(Reuters) - Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi said on Saturday sanctions were not the "fundamental" way to resolve North Korea-related issues and all sides should exercise calm and restraint.

The United Nations this week imposed new sanctions on North Korea following its third nuclear test on February 12.China, the isolated regime's only major ally and a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council, supported the sanctions and said it wanted the measures fully implemented.

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