Monday, February 17, 2014

CSPAN Korean Peninsula Security Concerns, Part 1 and Part 2

If you go to the 50:18 minute mark on Part 1 (link below) you can hear a PRC representative from the Chinese Embassy in DC give the Chinese perspective on its activities in the South China Sea, the ADIZ and territorial disputes.

Also in Part 2 you can hear from Syd Seiler, the White House NSC Director for Korea provide an interesting historical overview of nK policy and nK actions.

There was a 3d part that was not filmed because OSD did not want its representative speaking on the record.

FEBRUARY 14, 2014

Korean Peninsula Security Concerns, Part 1

Robert Zarate discussed U.S. national security concerns on and around the Korean Peninsula. He talked about relations between China, both Koreas, and Japan, including the presence of the U.S. Fleet in the East China Sea and North Korean objections to joint U.S.-Korea “war games,” and the impact of such cooperation on relations with China. After his presentation he was joined in discussion by ICAS fellows Joseph Bosco, David Maxwell, and Larry Niksch and responded to questions from members of the audience. 
The Institute for Corean-American Studies (ICAS) symposium on “The Korean Peninsula Issues and United States National Security” was held in the Rayburn House Office Building. close 

FEBRUARY 14, 2014

Korean Peninsula Security Concerns, Part 2


White House National Security Council Director for Korea Sydney Seiler spoke about security concerns on the Korean Peninsula, including North Korean nuclear ambitions and the impact of cooperation between China and the U.S. to pressure North Korea on relations with China. After his presentation he was joined in discussion by ICAS fellows Joseph Bosco, David Maxwell, and Larry Niksch and responded to questions from members of the audience.
The Institute for Corean-American Studies (ICAS) symposium on “The Korean Peninsula Issues and United States National Security” was held in the Rayburn House Office Building. close 

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